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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
KCSMMHZ
Jan 8, 2013 2:00am PST
have debts they cannot repay. they have three loans adding up to more than 300,000 euros in total. >> it was so easy to get credit. no questions asked. they just gave us something to sign, and we did not read the small print. if you do not have a regular income and cannot make the payments and you are two or three months behind, then you have to pay a late fee. the apartment has and 85,000- euro mortgage, and we pay up to 200 euros a month just to cover the interest. >> they are not alone. cyprus has the highest level of private household debt in the entire eurozone. when the supreme economy was booming and everyone had jobs, private individuals borrowed some 20 billion euros from banks to buy cars and set up businesses, but this crisis has left many unable to pay back their loans. >> i cannot pay my debt because no customers are coming to my shop, and in addition to the credit, i have to pay rent and wages. >> my loan is 1/5 of my salary, which means it is a balanced loan by the government. >> i need to pay 30,000 pounds each year so my son can study in england. i borrow money to
WHUT
Jan 28, 2013 8:30am EST
>> right now, the european union is in distress. what would a failed euro mean for the e.u. or for its largest trading partner, the u.s.? >> the '08/'09 financial panic/crash/great recession put tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 7:00am EST
with the ecb to make sure that the euro got through this problem. i was designated to ask you about the banking union. and at that point he was there optimistic. he thought the banking union could be worked on, in place in the first quarter of this year. well, now they've moved it to the first quarter hopefully in 2014 and you still have argument somehow it is going to be done. so you need to put a timeline on this and then you've got to adhere to it. but to get the banking system back with similar regulations throughout the eurozone is absolutelabsolutel absolutely necessary. it is key to the recovery of your. second of all is a plan that he talked about on july 26 in london last year. which is the outright monetary transaction, whereas the ecb would buy bonds from the country's in trouble, along with the european stability mechanism under certain conditions. in other words, certain conditionality. now, the ecb is going to put up that conditionality. they have enough on there. and so it will probably be international monetary fund, but they haven't really agreed what kind of conditionality the
CNBC
Jan 25, 2013 4:00am EST
stronger than expected. it rose in january, current conditions 108 versus the expectations of 107. euro/dollar is about 1% higher on the back of that news. the ifo institute, current conditions, 108. headline index, 104.2 versus 103. ross, what do you make of it? >> well, you can see what's going on with the euro there, 134. let's get more from finland. good to see you, alex. thanks indeed for joining us. the defense here that we're no longer in crisis fighting mode, the question as we look at data in germany, the question is whether we've made a fundamental turn, a fundamental change and whether things are temporary. >> i certainly hope we've made a fundamental turn. if this crisis is 100 steps, i'd say we are about 60 steps down the road. now, really, we have the fundamental institutional things in place. so that has calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. g
KCSMMHZ
Jan 1, 2013 2:00am PST
infertile women become mothers. in return, she will receive 750 euros per donation. that is a lot of money for the chemistry student. >> it is not a regular monthly income, but it is enough to help the family that urgently needs money. in my case, i needed to pay the registration fee so that i can keep working towards my master's degree. >> donating eggs is legal, and an increasing number of women in spain are doing it, including here. the clinics pay up to 900 compensation and expenses for the examinations, hormone treatment, and egg extraction. anna needs the money. although she is 26, she is almost too old. this clinic is looking for even younger donors, and it has plenty of applicants to choose from. >> every day, we get calls from two or three women who want to donate eggs. we now have a list of 200 donors, even though we do not have that many potential recipients. >> donating eggs is a lucrative source of income. although in spain it is illegal to sell them, donors receive money in the form of compensation. four years ago, this professor was a member of spain's committee on bioethics
KCSMMHZ
Jan 8, 2013 2:30pm PST
late in 2012. german companies sold over one trillion euros worth of goods and services by november. that is 4% of on the year before. however, that growth has slowed significantly. in recent months, analysts are blaming weak demand from the eurozone. germany is, of course, one of the world's top exporters. exporters account for almost half of germany's gdp. investors reacted negatively to the deteriorating export situation snuffing out a rally in frankfurt and sending the dax to a - close. our correspondence sent us this summary of the day's trading action from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> a few aspects of the export numbers from germany were well received on the trading floor. for example, the news that demand from other eurozone countries seems to have stabilized. of course, that was not enough to really lift the markets here. investors are a bit hesitant ahead of the earnings report season, and ahead of a meeting of the european central bank's council here in frankfurt this thursday. good news for the eurozone came in for the money markets. the permanent euro rescue fund auc
PBS
Jan 6, 2013 1:00pm PST
on for their livelihoods. britain exports an annual 80 million euros worth of scallops. the fishing season lasts all year, unlike in france. britain also sells scallops at lower prices and even exports them to france. the french are angered by the thriving british shellfish industry. in normandy, fnce,he attaches are more modest -- the catches are more modest. they cannot fish all year round, giving stocks time to replenish, but their efforts as sustainability are punishing them, they say. >> we've been trying to maintain stocks for years, but they come along and sees all the shellfish from under our noses. we do not think this is acceptable. >> every country's trawlers have an allotted number of days at sea. for these to be cut, a british trawler men would have to fish elsewhere and would not do all their fishing in the english channel -- for this to be cut, a british trawler -- for these to be cut, british trawlermen would have to fish elsewhere. the closed season means the french would not use up all their days. >> we hope we can negotiate with the french to have a swap of effort for us to stay out of
KCSMMHZ
Jan 31, 2013 2:30pm PST
banking giant as it post more than 2 billion euros in quarterly losses. >> and tornadoes batter six u.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied the existence of the vehicles, saying the israeli planes bombed a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are an
CNBC
Jan 8, 2013 4:00am EST
euros in debt. the treasury's funding this year is being outlined in madrid as we speak. as we get details on that, we'll absolutely bring them to you. we're talking about nations showing up and saying, give us the help. but spain hasn't even had to go that far. >> the spanish base can get some of on their money if they declare official emergencies. what they're trying to do is to avoid saying we really need the help, we're in trouble. all these countries, as the situation continues, it's clear they won't appear to be the only ones to call the situation off. and the spanish are aware of the fact that everyone else is aware of. we can deal with these countries. spain itself is a significantly different issue. this is a european problem, a potentially fatal one, but one that the spanish isn't really up to. >> can we still get beyond the german elections before there is any activation of the omc? >> we're talking about -- >> or can we go everywhere? >> the issue with the omt, if you're a central banker's performance, it's all these acronyms and different names. it's worth bearing in m
CNBC
Jan 9, 2013 4:00am EST
. euro/dollar, we've traded between 1.30, 1.50, 1.32 the last couple of weeks. that's where we stand in europe. we have the latest out of asia. >>> thank you. a mixed day of trade finish asian borses. the nikkei snapped a two-day losing streak ending .7% higher. talk as the boj set to ease its monetary policy this month by boosting its asset purchase program. after a brief pause yesterday the yen weakened against the u.s. dollar again today fueling automakers and other exporter stocks. >>> elsewhere, the shanghai finished flat as investors remained cautious ahead of trade and cip data due out. reports that more property curves will be made itted to tame rising housing prices. agricultural stocks surged on expectations that beijing's urban growth plan will support food production. in hong kong, the hang seng rebounded half a percent from the lowest level in the week. mainly banks gained momentum after ubs upgraded icbc. concerns over q4 earnings sent the kospi lower by .3%. the fifth straight day of losses for south korean shares. i.t. stocks and development ralliers pushed higher .4%
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 7:30am EST
bankrupt. very soon if the entire country had gone bankrupt. due to the structure of the euro zone where countries without a central bank behind them needed -- bailout of the banks and where the banks needed to continue lending money to bankrupt states, -- there was a domino effect because of the banks that were untrustworthy and the untrustworthy countries that they were associated with. this was the point in which the european union refused to realistically look at the situation. they decided that it was better to act, that it was just a crisis of public debt, and they did not -- instead of accepting that they had a poorly designed a currency union, they decided to implement austerity packages to ponte economies that were on the brink of bankruptcy. securing their default, in this way they created a recession that was not necessary for us to have. and they insisted in doing. at the cost, at great human co cost. and at a terrible cost for democracy. ladies and gentlemen, understanding here before you today, and i'm very sorry, but i'm going to say but i have to say this, none of these l
PBS
Jan 25, 2013 6:00pm PST
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
CBS
Jan 25, 2013 6:00pm EST
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute britain can't work out os own special deal. the
CNN
Jan 6, 2013 10:00am PST
, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth ra
CNBC
Jan 11, 2013 9:00am EST
, disappointing industrial production numbers in spain and the uk. but the euro is at a nine-month high this morning. we begin with the s&p, a five-year high. a lot riding on bank earnings. the report's not perfect. american express joining the list of financials that are cutting jobs. >>> best buy's troubles continue. they're not the only retailer under pressure this morning. jcpenney capping a bad week. >>> boeing under official view as a probe is taken on the plane. a cracked inshield and oil leak. >>> remember a cheaper iphone? a top apple executive said forget it. the company continues to focus on china. >>> we'll kick off with wells fargo, kicking off q4 results. the lending business came in a little bit lower than many analysts expecting. the numbers coming out after american express announced plans to cut 5,400 jobs and the s&p closed at fresh five-year highs. jim, it's been said, wfc, probably the most important report of the week. what kind of grade do we give it? >> the whisper was they weren't going to do this anyway. i don't know anyone would think they would -- people were
CNBC
Jan 14, 2013 9:00am EST
, the euro, we should note, is hitting 11-month highs against the u.s. dollar. marginal changes on a percentage basis. a road map this morning starts off with apple. even more doubts about the demand for the iphone 5 sending shares below. >> did you see your paycheck on friday? the payroll tax hike obviously kicking in for many americans. felt like a pay cut. will this be a temporary shock or a headwind as stocks hover at five-year highs. >> ubs achoirs tnt after a commission throws up road blocks. >>> to the top story. in the pre-market, we've seen apple shares fall below $500 for the first time in 11 months. the tech giant has cut its orders for iphone 5 components because of weaker than expected demands. screen orders for january to march quarter have fallen about half. the company had planned to order. apple said to cut orders for components other than screens. now, jim, we've had sort of this concern about demand for the iphone 5. i think last week when deutsche bank came out with the note from the japanese team, specifically citing this very issue, that's when the concerns
CNBC
Jan 23, 2013 4:00am EST
worried about the euro, the fiscal cliff, saw it as a safe currency. with the rest of the world stabilizing everyone's looking at the u.k.'s underlying fundamentals, no growth, lack of competitiveness, banks talking about weaker sterling. sterling looks vulnerable. >> what happens with the government's finances? the ocd's come out said public spending for 2012, 49% of gdp. it was 49.6% 2011. it was supposed to go down, it went up. >> the gdp numbers were much weaker than expected. we thought there would be a decent recovery in activity. it's than public spending overshot, it's that gdp has undershot. from the ratio point of view you've ended up with a higher level of public spending. >> when you talk it weakness in sterling, what is hsbc saying -- >> against 1.8150. not a huge fall but sterling is one of the weakest of the -- generally soft currencies over the next few months. >> before you go, let's move away from the u.k. just give us your -- your general view of how 2013's going to shape out on a global economy. >> it's a great rotation in the sense that i think we'll see a d
CNBC
Jan 24, 2013 4:00am EST
are moving a bit lower today. forex, the euro/dollar is one to watch, up 0.1% today. 1.3330. people are talking about how the ltr payment amounts to tightening. the question then becomes for some of the weaker economies whether it's too strong. dollar/yen moving up today. the yen is weakening by about 0.1%. fitch is saying british banks could need more capital. this has certainly been a theme. something, in fact, out in davos. ross, maria and everyone has been asking banks do they play to raise more capital? ross, what do they have to say about that? >> well, look, there's a lot of folks. what was interesting is when we spoke to the barclay's ceo mr. jenkins this morning said the whole industry when they were growing revenues didn't have to worry too much about costs. now they have to focus on the cost side of the business, which we know they're going to have a transformal plan and that's what they're going to be doing, as well. . capital requirements, how much capital is right when you're still going through periods of contracting growth because, obviously, the higher capital you h
WHUT
Jan 31, 2013 7:00am EST
, there is some growing optimism that greece will remain in the euro. the greek stock market has soared over the last year from a little -- from a very low base. transport workers are staging another 24-hour stoppage today. a doctor strike has left hospitals functioning with emergency staff. this comes after the greek finance minister told us that the bbc that he was expressing optimism about the growth outlook. our correspondent tells us why these workers are striking. >> the humanitarian catastrophe that has unfolded here in the last few years is very real. does bear in mind the figures -- just bear in mind the figures. it is staggeringly high unemployment. you have hospitals running out of medicine. schools are running out of textbooks. you have kids who are now having to have food vouchers in schools because their parents cannot afford to feed them. homelessness and poverty are soaring. that is the real cost of greece 's financial crisis, and it is very dramatic inedeed. >> let's move on. some of you think it's too early in the day. it's got to be 6:00 p.m. somewhere. today, half-year re
CNBC
Jan 28, 2013 9:00am EST
at the pound side. let's look at the euro versus the pound. as you see on this chart, pound's getting hit pretty hard. this is a 13-month low on the pound. let's switch around some of these controls trades. look how fascinating this is. let's not pare that losing pound to the pound/yen. pound/yen is at 31-month highs. if we look at the euro/yen, it's at 21-month highs. if we look at the dollar/yen, it's a 31-month high. even though the pound is having a tough time against the eurozone, everybody's having a party against the yen. these cross trades have been one of the biggest surprises to many for 2013 thus far. and it hasn't taken long. the other thing, of course, durables today is one of the reasons we're up several basis points, again, along with stocks. but if you look at the proxy for capital spending, up only .2% for the month of december. that was a little disappointing and maybe one of the more important components of today's durable series. jim, back to you. >> thank you, rick. let's check out the latest news in energy. sharon? >> the fact that hess is exiting the refining busine
CNBC
Jan 25, 2013 6:00am EST
's a couple of things. he said the victory lap. he said we relaunched the euro in 2012. a lot of talk with chris at this teen legarde in europe today. 2015, talking about this growth in the back half. i think draghi's intentions today were not to mess things up. the general feeling here is that what the ecb has done with the current situation, perhaps created the underlying conditions for growth. >> i hosted a dinner with christine legarde last night. one of the things that came up mario draghi said this morning that maybe we have good fall back into a problem again. >> well, that's a good question. but what we're hearing is this new buzz phrase out of davos, which is gsp. >> what is that? >> global stability put. i think larry summers may have been the one to coin this phrase. i heard it this morning when i met with a bunch of central bankers at a breakfast this morning. this phrase keeps coming up. the idea you have japan, you have the european central bank and you now have the fed obviously full throttle on monetary policy, underpinning and, you know, we meet here now in davos, the
CNBC
Jan 10, 2013 9:00am EST
to the opening bell. we're watching also outside of equities a big move in the euro u.s. dollar up 1%, which is a huge move for the currency markets. we're also watching oil. oil also up by about a percent or so on the back of the very good china export data that came in overnight. >> nigerian barges out there with huge cargos as i'm trying to rationalize how is it that o oil -- we're paying so much for gasoline. >> mineral exploration company based in vancouver. owner and operator of fitness clubs in the northeast. up pretty much across the board. just jumping out at me, intel, hewlett-packard and dell still stringing together pretty nice gains. hugh let hewlett-packard up. very fascinating report out yesterday, we had tony on last night on fast talking about the sum of the parts analysis. if hp breaks up or just realized to its full potential under meg whitman, $29 a share is what he's pegging some of the parts analysis at. >> when you pronounce something dead, whether sprint versus verizon and at&t versus clearwire, what we discover is there's a resilience even to companies that we basica
CNBC
Jan 2, 2013 4:00pm EST
the euro to borrow a tremendous amount of money using the german balance sheet and we're doing the same thing, abusing our world's reserve currency status, and when that ends, it's going to be very painful. >> the music hasn't stopped. the cash is still flowing so markets will go higher. >> you're right. >> all right. we've got to go at this point. i'm not sure we solved anything, but it was fun somehow. >> we did better than congress. >> that's true. >> at least we didn't curse. >> no f-bombs here at least. see you later. stocks kick off the year on a high note thanks in last part to last night's 11th-hour tax deal in congress. checking with bertha coombs for today's leaders and laggards. >> bill, a day for notable milestones. the dow starting the year up over 2% for only the tenth time in 100 years, the nasdaq's best one-day gain in over 15 months, the s&p starting the year with a sizable gain for the fifth straight year. that's never happened and the russell 2000 hitting a new all-time high. zipcar was the russell's biggest percentage gainer on a $500 million cash deal to be acquired
FOX Business
Dec 31, 2012 7:00pm EST
the liberty crushing aspects the euro one you wrote that u.s.liby amba policymakers opposed by christopher stevens havelaw sacrificed u.s. lives, ourou as, nation is ignoring sharia lawy and practices. you assert that the islamic totalitarianism, you are saying that it has a tutorial at terry and winter.ave a sular >> we have those that we chosea, to undermine and replace. hosnib mubarak, even the odious qadhafi. yet what is their replacement?n the replaceent from the get-go,o we actually supported them of muslim brotherhood jihadist to have a supremacist outlook. and we are still, the late ambassador stevens unfortunateln chose to go intofo th jihadist i hotbed in libya, which dates back to our borders. they were fighting then. thanyou so much for bei with rin us. lou: as the housing market really recovering? $17 trillion is riding on the answer. thes ceounting forome $82 bi lou: foreign buyerare helping to boost our housing msarket. those buyers accounted for billn $82 billion in home sales over the past year. 9 billion of those dollarschines coming from the chinese. t second only to th
FOX News
Jan 2, 2013 2:00pm PST
: in washington a big deal. they have the big crowds and block off the street and wear the euro trash outfit and look at you with great distapism want to drive them off the road. >> dana: exercise to me has a benefit for your mind. only way the human body gets rid of stress is work it off. that's good why it is good to walk or go to core fusion. >> kimberly: indoor court and hot tubbing are stress relievers. >> eric: slightly overweight. >> bob: obese doesn't help you. >> eric: so if you are a little overweight you work out and keep yourself in shape. so you are healthier. i love working out. i run four times a week and do push-ups every morning of my life. >> dana: push-up are the best exercise you can do. >> greg: you do it over a mirror. >> kimberly: he is like this. "god you look good." [ laughter ] >> bob: kimberly and i know that sex burns 600-calories an hour. >> kimberly: why do you say we know this? freddie burns $1600 an hour. -- freudian slip. >> greg: that the beckel institute. >> kimberly: you dragged me in to that. >> bob: it's good for you. limbers you up, when you run think a
CNBC
Jan 2, 2013 6:00pm EST
guard msci euro etf, symbol vgk. that's victor george ken for all of you home gamers. i like it so much i own it for my charitable trust. you can follow it. a lot of reasoning why stephanie link and i co-director believe in this. it pays you a solid 3.7% yield while you're waiting. next up, yeah, there's -- china. not done. chinese economy has been in the process of bottoming for a while now. i think the genuine turn could be at hand. we know the chinese central bank has been providing capital injections to banks. last year they cut the reserve requirement three times, interest rates twice. i expect pair policy to remain easy. capital injections turned the tide. hit record levels in september/october. something that's helped the chinese economy dramatically as we see from improving macrodata points. purchasing managers numbers, industrial production, retail sales, housing numbers, you name it china has beaten inflation, they have the flexibility to do more juice to the economy if they need to the chinese party just got a new leadership in november. these guys are anxious to make a good
Current
Jan 10, 2013 8:00pm PST
austerity has done to europe. it has thrown the entire euro zone back into depression, unemployment in italy spain and greece. youth unemployment in spain and greece is over 55%. the battle joke, i'm partially irish is back in ireland what is ireland's leading export? the irish. as soon as you get your university degree, you leave. >> cenk: tough times ahead. i wish we had some real regulators in washington, one of the old regulators who did his job, william black. thank you. >> that you can cenk. >> cenk: when we come back, a football player who's head was a mess. there's an amazing story about that and theism pact on his family. >> there is a big risk. >> there is huge risk. >> it's not worth it for me to not have a very, very excited about that and very proud of that. >>beltway politics from inside the loop. >>we tackle the big issues here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. >>dc columnist and four time emmy winner bill press opens current's morning news block. >>we'll do our best to carry the flag from 6 to 9 every morning. >>liberal and proud of it. >> cenk
CNN
Jan 27, 2013 7:00am PST
they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere there is a sense of caution. in pwc's annual global ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had go
FOX News
Jan 8, 2013 8:00am PST
will leave the euro zone or know despite all of the very elaborate fixes worked up to keep countries like greece from going completely under the problem of growth remains. and as long as europe is not growing then the fundamental economic problem here remains. the unemployment rate for the entire euro zone rose to a record high of 11.8% for november. that is up from 11.7% from october. but up from 10.6% a year ago. these are images of italians lining up to fill out forms for jobs. it's not uncommon to hear young italians say that they simply feel that the culture is skewed against them, not making way for them in this economy. prime minister mario monte passed legislation to make it easier for people tow start u to start up their own companies because youth unemployment is at 37%. some people are thinking better to make jobs for themselves than wait to be hired. spain has the word unemployment problem with a staggering rate of 26.6% for november, as unemployment rises you question how much longer governments can stick to their austerity programs. and the problem is with people losing jobs
FOX Business
Jan 2, 2013 1:00pm EST
. scramp that. the dollar is stronger. it was weaker earlier. there you go, 31.62 is across to the euro. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at lelzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a
FOX News
Jan 2, 2013 7:00pm PST
rate and if it defaults on its next round it's going to end up getting kicked out of the euro zone. why do you say we're on the path to greece? >> well, because the people in greece continue to reject any kind of real reform because they've been so long denying reality that they think they can do it forever. the americans are not that far from when we had a balanced budget. we're not that far from when we paid for what we consumed. but we've got to get back to it pretty soon because after 12 years you're beginning to build the generation of citizens and even more generation of politicians who think this can go on forever. >> greta: what do you think is going to happen with the debt ceiling? people didn't notice, but secretary geithner sent a letter to capitol hill we have hit the debt ceiling. he can now do some sort of maneuvering with the money so we at least have cash for about two months, but we're about to run out of cash and a big fight offer the debt ceiling. what's going to happen? >> first of all, tim geithner, bless his heart, he's a little disingenuous in one sense. >> greta:
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 9:00am EST
feature or for all economists, particularly the advanced economies. force the euro area -- as far as the euro area is concerned, we think that a lot has been achieved in terms of policies, in terms of new tools in the tool box that the europeans have available to fight crisis, yet firewalls have not yet proven operational. progress needs to be made on banking union, and clearly continued if not further monetary easing will be appropriate in order to sustain demand. for the united states, we think that all sides should pull together in the national interest avoiding further avoidable policy mistakes that is failing to agree on increasing the debt ceiling on time and prior to that preferably and reaching agreement on medium-term debt reduction. that i mentioned earlier. for the nonadvanced economies, and i'm putting together the emerging markets as well as the low income countries, clearly those countries are faring at a much better pace in terms of growth. but everywhere i've traveled in the last two months in africa, in latin america and in asia there's always been a concern about
CNBC
Jan 23, 2013 6:00am EST
-fledged member. using the euro and everything else. i guess it makes it less likely that they'll adopt a common currency. if they're thinking about leaving the union. >> absolutely. no, there's a widespread sense of relief that britain isn't more closely tied in. if you leak at the performance of the economy, the fact britain has its own central bank, it can pursue monetary policies or policies appropriate for britain and not have to worry about other member states certainly is being taken as a sign of relief. and there's very little sentiment certainly for joining the euro now. although i will say the bank of england numbers fight they're not happy with how strong sterling is. they think currency should be weaker and it could help performance going forward. echoing the currency that we're starting to hear this year. >> no talk about becoming the 51st state which they probably have wanted to do for a while given how we excelled after we broke off. they could come back into the fold, perhaps joining the u.s. and adopt the dollar if they really wanted some -- any talk of that at this point? would
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2013 8:00pm EST
. written -- britain. >> i will tell you why germany is doing so much better, it is the euro. germany is an exporting country, and they export to their neighbors. it prevents their neighbors from devaluing their currency. >> where is the context for your numbers? i am sure you are not advocating borrowing 40 cents on the dollar. [indiscernible] >> i said they are in a crisis because of decades of certain policies. >> that have put together an unsustainable federation. >> put him back on my washington hat as we move along, one of the most successful theories on our blog has been this is where your money went. people in europe and the united states stand up with signs saying what kind of government money they get, whether it's health care, welfare. the one that went viral was the author of the harry potter books proudly standing with the dole in front of her. she and her family were supported by government benefits before she became a billionaire. should we not give everyone a chance? we are going to have more people who can either fall through the cracks or come back and be productive
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2013 9:00am EST
of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget? and while they're at it, they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his policy? >> the reality is this: he can't convince anyone on europe. last year he announced out of the december negotiations with a veto and the agreement went ahead anyway. you've thrown in the towel even before these negotiations have begun. he can't convince european leaders, he can't even convince his own back benchers. he is weak abroad, he is weak at home. it's john major all over again. >> ed miliband and david cameron. and a few hours later the commons debate on the e.u. budget began in earnest. >> now, let me take this multiannual framework -- or e.u. budget, to use a simple word -- to ask for the european union to ask for a 10% real increase above inflation is insulting to our constituents, it's ensubtling, it is insulting to the people of spain and italy ask and portugal and ireland who are being told to pull in tear belts. -- in their belts. >> isn't the trut
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